MKHC history

At the turn of the 20th century, Mt. Kisco was a bustling community of merchants and farmers. In 1906, a group of Orthodox Jews built a small European style Shteibel known as Mt. Kisco Hebrew Congregation. The Shul thrived as it proudly helped the surrounding area grow. Members participated in local and national endeavors. Some served in World War I and II as well as and other national conflicts. They are honored by a plaque in the sanctuary.

Demographic changes resulted in congregants and their children relocating. The Shul was generously supported by the nearby Nitra Yeshiva Farm Settlement, as well as Phillip Herzog and his wife Tovah, owners of Kedem and Baron Herzog Wineries. In 1991, in a tearful ceremony, the synagogue was within days of closing. For safe keeping, the last seven members marched the Torah scrolls to the nearby Conservative synagogue, Bet Torah. However immediately after, Jerome Roth, a local Wall Street banker and newly observant Jew, brought MKHC back to life the year's High Holidays.

The rebirth of MKHC continued in April 1999, as the synagogue doubled its size to 1600 square feet. The catalyst for the project was made by a donation from financier Steven Chernys of Plantation, Florida. In celebration of its 100th anniversary, a Centennial Gala was held December 3, 2006. Many friends who helped sustain MKHC were honored.

We are now all become responsible to contribute to a thriving traditional Jewish community. We cherish the promise of a vibrant and exciting future, learning and sharing our deep-rooted Jewish values of family, charity and Tikkun Olam.