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Updated: 2 hours 13 min ago

Restaurants okayed to say food kosher without rabbinate’s approval

Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
Times of Israel Staff



Landmark High Court ruling finds informing consumers about food's origins cannot be prohibited, denting monopoly by ultra-Orthodox-controlled state rabbinical body



The High Court of Justice on Tuesday ruled that Israeli restaurateurs are permitted to inform their clientele that they serve kosher food even if they do not have kashrut certification from the Israeli state rabbinate.
The Law Prohibiting Fraud in Kashrut states that “the owner of a food establishment may not present the establishment as kosher unless it was given a certificate of kashrut,” and that only official state or local rabbis may give such certificates.


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Was the oldest mug shop in history just discovered?

Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am
by Benyamin Cohen for FromtheGrapevine 


Archaeologists have found a chalkstone vessel workshop that dates back thousands of years.


You saunter into your office break room for a cup of joe and scan the room for a usable mug. There, far in the corner, is the "World's Best Dad" cup that some co-worker left there months ago – so long, in fact, that nobody can quite remember who it belongs to. Nonetheless, it sits in the corner collecting dust. You think that mug is old? Think again.

A team of archaeologists in Israel has just discovered the remains of a rare mug workshop in the northern part of the country. It's believed to be thousands of years old. The dig site was full of chalkstone vessels – mostly mugs and bowls – that were in various stages of production.

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Jerusalem gets smart with new digital gadget library

Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:00am
By Viva Sarah Press for Israel21c


On loan are smartwatches and laptops, 3D cameras, smart computer chips, gaming computers, tablets, and Android and iOS smartphones.


Israel’s startup community has inaugurated its first gadget library. The Jerusalem venue, called The Device Lab, has cutting-edge technologies and devices on loan for entrepreneurs and students to try out their ideas.

US colleges have long offered their academic communities the opportunity to come try out new and old technologies on an array of gadgets and computers at so-called gadget libraries.

Now, Israeli developers – new and veteran – have a library of their own in which to tinker about.

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Chinese-Israeli ed-tech startup teaches kids to code

Mon, 08/28/2017 - 12:00am
By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c


Shanghai-based LeapLearner represents the first global venture built from the ground up by Chinese and Israeli cofounders.


Chinese students rank best in the world on standardized tests but don’t excel in thinking out of the box. Israeli kids aren’t great test-takers but have exceptional innovation and problem-solving skills.

LeapLearner, the first Chinese-Israeli startup, puts those qualities together in a disruptive online and offline platform to teach kids coding along with critical 21st century skills including innovation, self-learning, problem-solving, creativity and adaptability.

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Rish Lakish olive oil: A family affair

Mon, 08/21/2017 - 12:00am
By Lin Arison & Diana C. Stoll/The Desert and the Cities Sing for Israel21c


At Rish Lakish, olive picking is still done by hand unlike at most commercial olive groves.


There are countless stories in Israel of small-scale businesses that cobble together several undertakings in order to succeed. The Rish Lakish olive oil press, in the village of Zippori in the Lower Galilee, is one of these.


At the head of this family-owned business are Micha and Rachelle Noymeir, but their six children played a formative role in the establishment of their olive oil production. Their headquarters, a lovely straw-bale structure, was built by the Noymeir sons.


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Spain To Create Ladino Academy In Israel To Help Preserve Dying Jewish Language

Mon, 08/14/2017 - 12:00am
From JTA


Spain’s leading linguistic authority will create an academy in Israel dedicated to the study and preservation of the Ladino language.

The institution will be the 24th branch of the Spanish Royal Academy, the Guardian reported Tuesday.

Dario Villanueva, director of the Spanish Royal Academy, or RAE, said Ladino is “an extraordinarily important cultural and historical phenomenon” that deserved its own academy.

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Jerusalem's National Library Presents: All the World's Hebrew Manuscripts Online

Mon, 08/07/2017 - 12:00am
By Ofer Aderet for Haaretz


The new website features the world's biggest collection of Jewish and Hebrew manuscripts and should be a treasure trove for researchers


Some 70 years after David Ben-Gurion expressed his dream of gathering all Hebrew manuscripts from around the world and bringing them to Jerusalem, his vision is being realized this week with the launch of the National Library of Israel’s new website.


The goal of the site, called Ktiv, the International Collection of Digitized Hebrew Manuscripts, is to collect scans of all Hebrew manuscripts ever written anywhere, from dozens of libraries, archives and collections around the world.


“This is the world’s biggest collection of Jewish and Hebrew manuscripts,” Dr. Aviad Stollman, the head of collections at the National Library, told Haaretz.


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If a bike could talk to a car, this is what it would say

Mon, 07/31/2017 - 12:00am
By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c


Israeli company’s bike-to-vehicle (B2V) technology aims to promote safety and prevent motorcycle accidents.

 

Motorcycle accidents are one of the world’s leading causes of unnatural deaths, accounting for nearly one-quarter of 1.25 million traffic fatalities worldwide every year.

A new bike-to-vehicle (B2V) wireless communication technology from Israel’s Autotalks is designed to turn the corner on that grim statistic.

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Small Israeli family firm hits the Target (and Amazon)

Mon, 07/24/2017 - 12:00am
By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c


It takes chutzpah to compete with housewares giants like Rubbermaid, but Bram Industries leverages Israeli innovation to get prime shelf space.


Whoever said little guys can’t win clearly does not know about Israel’s Bram Industries.

One of #1 global retailer Walmart’s smallest suppliers, the 200-employee company based in the working-class southern city of Sderot also peddles its Life Story brand plastic tableware, housewares and storage products in American and European mega chains such as Target, TJ Maxx, Amazon, Bed, Bath & Beyond, Tesco, HomeGoods, Home Depot, The Container Store, GiFi and Carrefour, plus stores in Panama and Mexico.

Bram was on Fast Company’s list of 10 most innovative Israeli companies for 2016 for “bringing sustainability to the plastics market – including a fully biodegradable shopping bag” and disposable cutlery made from cornstarch.

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Israelis lead search for dark matter in universe

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 12:00am
By Brian Blum for Israel21c


A large portion of the mass in the universe doesn’t emit light and is invisible to telescopes. This project seeks new methods to detect dark matter.


Does dark matter exist? Astronomical measurements say yes, but it’s never been detected.

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) is now leading the search for the illusive matter, which is hypothesized to be one of the basic components of the universe, five times more abundant than ordinary matter.

BGU will construct and operate an advanced dark matter detector based on the theory that some types of dark matter produce a signal imitating a magnetic field and may therefore be detectable by extremely sensitive magnetic sensors.

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Flytrex manages drone delivery from store to door

Mon, 07/10/2017 - 12:00am
By Brian Blum for Israel21c


The Israeli company plans to be the FedEx of the drone delivery world, with a system enabling customers to operate an entire fleet of drones remotely.


You’ve just run out of toothpaste and you’ve got a big date tonight. There’s no time to drive to the store and there’s too much traffic to send a courier.

You’re starving for sushi but your favorite restaurant says it will be at least an hour to get take-out to your door.

No worries. Just send in the drones.

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You can plug your phone into this tree

Mon, 07/03/2017 - 12:00am
by Ilana Strauss for FromtheGrapevine


These eTrees in France use solar panels to generate electricity.


Have you ever realized your phone was about to die and wished you could plug it into a nearby tree? No? Well, you have no imagination. Because such a tree exists, and it's in France.

Israeli company Sol-logic invented a solar powered "eTree." The tree's panels, which resemble branches, collect energy from the sun and turn it into power, which people can use to charge their phones. But that's just the beginning. To see all the other neat things these trees can do, watch this video below.

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Why Israel is a fast-moving force in smart transportation

Mon, 06/26/2017 - 12:00am
By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c    


‘The megatrend in this world is electric, connected and autonomous. That put Israel in the center because those are things we are really good at.’


In June 2013, 250 Israeli smart-transportation visionaries flocked to the inaugural EcoMotion “unconference” to share their crazy fantasies about the future of moving people from one place to another.

Only four years later, leaders of the global automotive and transportation industry were among 1,500 participants at the fifth annual EcoMotion Main Event at the Peres Center in Jaffa on May 18.

It hasn’t taken long for Israel to emerge as a significant source of innovation for autonomous  and connected vehicles, navigation, public transportation,  alternative fuels, super-efficient engines, urban parking and environment-friendly personal and mass transportation.

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Vietnam, an Emerging Partner in Israel’s ‘Asia Pivot’ Policy

Mon, 06/19/2017 - 12:00am
By Alvite Ningthoujam for BESA (The Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies)


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Israel is increasingly looking for partnerships in economic, political, cultural, and military sectors with countries in Southeast Asia, and relations with Vietnam in particular are on the upswing. While cooperation between Israel and Vietnam is largely focused on civilian sectors, defense ties are also growing more robust, with Israel getting involved in upgrading aging Vietnamese weapons systems and collaborating on weapons development. There is a visible bonhomie between the nations, and Israel-Vietnam ties are likely to deepen.

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Israeli device simplifies hernia surgery and recovery

Mon, 06/12/2017 - 12:00am
By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c


FasTouch gives surgeons a new tool for attaching mesh to tissue, leading to fewer complications, less pain and faster recovery from hernia procedures.


Some five million Americans have a hernia, a protrusion of an organ or tissue through a weak spot in the abdomen or groin, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Traditionally, open hernia-repair surgery involved stitching a mesh patch, or surrounding tissue, in place over the weak tissue. Today, many hernias are repaired laparoscopically, which is less invasive. Because suturing through tiny laparoscopic incisions is difficult, most surgeons use a less ideal solution — screw-like tacks to secure the mesh to the abdominal wall or bone.

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Israeli paratroopers re-create iconic photo on 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War

Mon, 06/05/2017 - 12:00am
By Andrew Tobin for JTA

 

David Rubinger’s iconic photograph of three paratroopers at the Western Wall is the defining image of the 1967 Six-Day War.

The men in the photo — Dr. Yitzhak Yifat, Tzion Karasenti and Chaim Oshri — have proudly served as symbols of the historic Israeli victory for the past five decades. But in an interview with JTA, they said the war for them was just as much about loss.

“To liberate the Kotel was something amazing,” Yifat told JTA, referring to the Western Wall. “But we never celebrated. What was there to celebrate? We had lost many of our friends.”

Between June 5 and 15, in honor of the Six-Day War’s 50th anniversary, the three former paratroopers, now in their 70s, will re-create Rubinger’s photo in their first-ever tour of the United States. the tour, sponsored by Friends of the IDF, will stop at Jewish communities and other locations in the Cleveland, Detroit, San Francisco, Chicago, Atlanta, Boston and Baltimore areas. They will also recount some of the sacrifices that were made in the battle for Jerusalem.

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